Web Version | Subscribe | Back Issues | Resource Center | Feedback | About Us

Volume 1: Issue #34

How to Stop Stress from
Giving You a Heart Attack

A distinguished businessman in my little town recently passed away from a heart attack. He’d run into some terrible business reverses, after years of having been very successful and admired.

I suspect these painful, humiliating events helped lead to his heart attack. Since he was almost exactly my age, the event got my attention.

Stress is a killer. It’s as simple as that.

Although the connection between stress and heart health has been recognized since ancient times, surprisingly there has been little scientific evidence to back this up.

Until now.

Continued below…

Special Message From Lee Euler, Editor

This “Forbidden” Food
Super-Charges Your Brain

It’s being called a “silent epidemic”. . .

A brain health crisis already growing faster than Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. . .and affecting the memory and cognitive ability of Americans as young as 40.

Over the next decade, the U.S. government will spend more than $3 billion to study this threat. Yet for millions of young and middle-aged adults, this research may come too late.

And you know what? They don’t need to spend the $3 billion because the major cause of memory loss has already been identified. Yet almost no one knows about it.

Millions of people are losing their memories and seeing their brain health go downhill because nine out of ten of us don’t consume enough of a vital nutrient. . .

. . .and the reason we don’t get enough of this nutrient is that doctors tell us NOT to eat the foods that happen be richest in this “missing ingredient for good brain health”!!

That’s right, the very food you need most for memory and cognitive health is a forbidden food!

It’s a national scandal. . . but it’s also an opportunity for you to save your brain and improve your memory like you wouldn’t believe. . .

Click here and I’ll tell you the full story. . .

Stress calcifies the arteries

Researchers from University College London carried out several studies of older adults given a demanding task. Subjects who responded with a rise in the stress hormone cortisol had increased calcification of the arteries compared to those with cortisol levels that remained stable.

While greater calcification narrows the arteries and probably raises the risk of a heart attack or stroke, studies didn’t prove this, so scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston went one step further.

They undertook two studies to investigate the role of stress in causing inflammation in the arteries.

Stress sets off an immune response

In the first study, 29 medical staff working in a highly stressful environment — an intensive care unit (ICU) – were all found to have higher white blood cell counts than their off-duty colleagues, indicating an overactive immune system.

This study was followed by one inducing chronic stress in mice that were healthy, but prone to heart disease.

Stress activated the growth of stem cells in the bone marrow that develop into red and white blood cells. These in turn increased the production of “disease-promoting inflammatory” white blood cells.

The inflammation produced vulnerable lesions in the animals’ arteries that are similar to those that can rupture and cause heart attacks and strokes in humans. This suggests that the ICU medical team and others in stressful jobs would be at greater risk.

The authors said this study provided new evidence for the role of blood cells in cardiovascular disease and a direct link between stress and inflammation.

Following this research, other scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital presented new findings at the 2016 American College of Cardiology conference. Their findings took our understanding even further.

Stress increases the risk of heart attack

The researchers scanned the brains, bone marrow and arteries of 293 disease-free patients with an average age of 55. During the five-year study period the participants suffered 22 incidents of heart attack or stroke.

The researchers found that greater activity in the amygdala — the brain’s fear and stress center — led to more inflammation in the arteries and increased production of inflammation-promoting immune cells in the bone marrow.

In fact, after adjusting their results to take into account age, gender and other risk factors, the researchers found there was a 14-fold increased risk of a heart attack or stroke for each unit increase in brain stress.

Over the five years, more than a third of the most highly stressed participants had a cardiovascular event compared to only one out of 20 of those who experienced the least stress.

A co-author of the study, Dr. Ahmed Tawakol, said, “The brain’s fear centers, bone marrow and arterial inflammation may together be part of a system that provokes cardiovascular disease.

“The pathway could be that a stressful event triggers activation of the amygdala which then leads to release of …pro-inflammatory [immune cells] from the bone marrow that in turn contribute to atherosclerotic inflammation.”

Protecting yourself from a heart attack

If there were any doubts about the damaging effect of stress, these findings should remove them.

In an ideal world, eliminating the causes of negative stress would be the way to go, but often this is not possible. A chronically ill spouse or drug-abusing child isn’t going to disappear just because we need to reduce our stress levels. Many of us have no other choice but to find ways to cope with stress.

Fortunately there are lots of ways to achieve this. Getting seven or eight hours of good sleep each night is essential. If you’re not sleeping well, get the problem fixed.

Other tips range from walking in the forest, laying on a beach or watching the sunset, to exercising, learning meditation, taking up yoga or just reading a novel. The important thing is to find something that works for you. Me, I can’t imagine life without my daily meditation and half hour walk.

Herbal medicine also has much to offer. There are many herbs that lower stress and inflammation in the body. These include chamomile, ashwaghanda, rhodiola, rosemary, holy basil, ginger and turmeric.

Take up these options and you should be more resilient when you hit life’s inevitable bumps.

 

Best regards,

Lee Euler,

Publisher


References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19744954
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22328931
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4087061
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/03/160324192429.htm

Health Disclaimer: The information provided above is not intended as personal medical advice or instructions. You should not take any action affecting your health without consulting a qualified health professional. The authors and publishers of the information above are not doctors or health-caregivers. The authors and publishers believe the information to be accurate but its accuracy cannot be guaranteed. There is some risk associated with ANY cancer treatment, and the reader should not act on the information above unless he or she is willing to assume the full risk.

Reminder: You're getting this email because you purchased a product from us, or signed up for our free newsletter and gave us permission to contact you. From time to time we'll alert you to other important information about supplements and other health information. If you want to update or remove your email address, please scroll down to the bottom of this page and click on the appropriate link.

To ensure delivery of this newsletter to your inbox and to enable images to load in future mailings, please add customerservice@greenvalleynaturalsolutions.com to your email address book or safe senders list.